{}schooling

is a dialogue about the future of education in the arts and architecture.

questions the role of the institution.

seeks to find genuine alternatives to the systems of the status quo.

is in favour of education that is self-organised, co-operative and worthwhile.

is sceptical about ‘radicality’, ‘experimentation’ and the emancipatory potential of the virtual.

aims to actively make things better, rather than believing that eventually they will be.

is against all forms of exclusivity.

Contributions

Ref Type Date Title Author
DE.005 Essay 17.07.2020 ‘Zoom, it’s been fun, but I think we need some time apart…’ Ted Targett View, Download
DE.004 Essay 02.06.2020 Situated Education in a Time of Pandemic Anna Colin View, Download
DE.003 Visual Essay 25.05.2020 Bit by Bit David Reinfurt View, Download
DE.002 Essay 21.05.2020 A Teacher's Presence James Langdon View, Download
DE.001 Essay 02.05.2020 Fairer Universities are Possible Margherita Huntley View, Download

Resources

+ About

{}schooling formed during a moment when the institution was forced to question its relevance with respect to art and architectural education. It constitutes an open-source and growing archive of critical texts, references and visual content that aims to consider new methods of teaching and learning for the common good and the role of both physical and virtual space in systems of study. Educators, scholars, practitioners and theorists are commissioned to write concise propositional or polemical articles that propose clear alternatives to the status quo. The responses that are then generated among readers are published in order to develop a productive and collective dialogue that is predicated on respect, common intent and the possibility of disagreement. {}schooling relies on active participation, dialogue and debate. It openly accepts responses, suggestions and references for publication in all written and visual forms.

+ Manifesto

{}schooling

is a dialogue about the future of education in the arts and architecture.

questions the role of the institution.

seeks to find genuine alternatives to the systems of the status quo.

is in favour of education that is self-organised, co-operative and worthwhile.

is sceptical about ‘radicality’, ‘experimentation’ and the emancipatory potential of the virtual.

aims to actively make things better, rather than believing that eventually they will be.

is against all forms of exclusivity.

+ Reading List

Anonymous. ‘A Call for Complaint: for Plague Speech, for Sick Speech’. Riseup, 2020

Froud, Daisy and Harriet Harriss (eds). Radical Pedagogies: Architectural Education and the British Tradition. London: RIBA Publishing, 2015

Hoejlund, Marie. ‘Perpetual Beta & Post-Capitalist Desires: The Curriculum of Evening Class’. The Gradient, 25 February 2019

Holland, Pat. The Hornsey Film. 1970

Hebert, Stine and Anne Szefer Karlsen (eds). Self-Organised. London: Open Editions, 2013

Illich, Ivan. Deschooling Society. London: Penguin, 1973

Ivison, Tim and Tom Vandeputte (eds). Contestations: Learning from Critical Experiments in Education. London: Bedford Press, 2013

Kohler, Max. ‘Zoom Zoom Zoom’. Content Free, 31 March 2020

Meineche Hansen, Sidsel and Tom Vandeputte (eds). Politics of Study. London: Open Editions, 2015

Staff. ‘As Curricula Move Online, Yale Art Students Demand Tuition Refund’. Artforum, 23 March 2020

Thorne, Sam. School: A Recent History of Self-Organized Art Education. Berlin: Sternberg Press, 2017